Underrated Gems

What are some titles found on DC Universe that you think are great but no one else talks about?

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Nightwing the New Order.
Madame Xanadu.
Omega Men.
Huntress: Cry For Blood.
Justice League Cry For Justice
JSA the Golden Age.
JSA the Liberty Files: The Whistling Skull.
Black Canary & Green Arrow.

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Mystik U
Tiny Titans
Gotham Academy

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Underrated WildStorm titles

Underrated DC titles

  • Super Powers, volume 1. Jack Kirby’s little-known '80s gem.
  • Trinity of Sin: Pandora. A fun New 52 read starring a vastly underrated character.
  • Blackhawks. The New 52 iteration of the property and a wonderfully fun title, along with a principal antagonist that is deserving of more use.
  • OMAC. Another gem by Jack Kirby.
  • OMAC. The New 52 take on the above.
  • Justice League Elite. The best Justice League mini-series of the 21st century, so far. Writer Joe Kelly did no wrong with the Justice League in this book and in the regular JLA series that was concurrent to it.
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I, Vampire (2011). It was a New 52 launch title. Terrible timing to release. Looked like it was just trying to cally in on Twilight’s popularity. But it’s a very good horror book. It didn’t last long, so it’s a quick, great read.

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Talon by Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV.
This was one of my favorite spin off titles. It was a great exploration of what a Talon from the Court of Owls would do if they basically defected. It also reminds me of the Goodwin/Simonson run of Manhunter.

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Grayson by Tom King. Easily one of the highlights of the New 52 for me.

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Hourman by Tom Peyer is simply put amazing

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I thoroughly enjoyed Gregg Hurwitz’s run on Batman: The Dark Knight (#10-29), which I’ve hardly ever seen anybody talk about. Scott Snyder’s Batman gets all of the attention from that era, but this run better hits my personal Batman sweet spot. Scarecrow, Mad Hatter and Clayface at their most brutal and sadistic, but also at their most… well, if not sympathetic, then understandable. The run delves deep into their psychologies and backstories to examine just what makes them tick and what turned them into the monsters that they are. Very thoughtful and very well-written, and also mostly disconnected from the other Batman continuity that was going on at the time, so it’s easy to pick up and read by itself. Highly recommended.

Pro tips for reading: Read #0 either first or after #15, and Annual #1 after #21. Otherwise, they’ll interrupt the stories that they were published during. #23.1-#23.4 can be skipped, since they were Forever Evil tie-ins that weren’t written by him.