The Justice League of Antarctica Attempts the Oregon Trail

As requested by @Emanresu G’Nort will try to lead his friends through the Oregon Trail.

Our team is G’Nort, the pilot Major Disaster, Mighty Bruce the mechanic, Cluemaster the animal master, Big Sir our doctor, and Scarlet Skier our navigator. Only room for 6 so Clock King and Multi Man took another route.

I wanted to roleplay this team of losers right so no skills will be used, and we will be leaving on February 1st for awful cold weather.

To prepare for the trip these guys somehow con over 130 people to elect G’Nort their trail guide and pay him 700 dollars. In addition to our brickmaker salary we get a 6 month package, the cheapest winter clothing we can find (coats are expensive), blankets, a single pair of boots, a fishing pole, 5 chickens since I have not used them in a while, cheap instruments, some games, lots of spare parts, and 11 oxen.

First thing I notice is how awful the weather is this time. It is constantly at below zero, but it then magically warms up before every river and then freezes again.

Surely Major Disaster will not be able to get us through… Scratch that. We actually never have a single river issue all game. Who knew the guy who ruins everything he touches was so great at moving wagons?

All the cold gives us health problems, and their is no trail food to keep the supply replenished, so it is fast travel with the occasional nice break. 13 days in, and we rest for two days, and that become the usual way, take decent breaks at nice water sources.

After that the weather gets even worse, but thankfully these guys really love fiddle music, as everybody is incredibly happy. Compared to the comics these guys cannot get enough of each other when they are actually moving and doing things.

I then tried resting in the cold which was a mistake, as that cost 10 days. Thankfully the when the weather was cleared we had some successful bear hunting (we caught a horde of small bears, and thankfully I remembered salt).

For hunting I never got a big score, which kept making me think we needed more. As a result I did it regularly and kept getting small bears and dears. The Justice League Antarctica did not notice they had much food, until it turns out they had over 1,500 pounds of meat.

There are no edible plants anywhere, so we have to buy pickles at every store to go with our consistently small supply of butter, cheese, and biscuits.

On March 5th both Mighty Bruce and Scarlet Skier get badly sick, but the overall health is still holding on. Apparently The JLant is very hardy.

After the sickness was an entire weak of terribly cold weather in March, and Mighty Bruce died. We somehow dug him a nice grave in the subzero ground. :heavy_heart_exclamation:

Next day we find another grave dug up by wolves, so it is not looking good, but morale is somehow still high.

After that it finally warmed up for a few weeks. For the only time in the game Major Disaster had a disaster, but it was a minor tipover on a big hill.

A week after that Scarlet Skier is sick again, and in April the weather again is consistently freezing. After that we go to find one of our missing oxen, but in the process Scarlet Skier gets injured again.

700 miles in, and the weather if finally better. We are almost done with the terrible place called “Nebraska”, 5 people still live, and shockingly all 5 chickens have made it.

At the end of April we lost our first chicken and Scarlet Skier :heavy_heart_exclamation:

We continue on and make and need to go through the Rockies. We try the sand path and… immediatly get stuck and turn around to the three rivers path and Major Disaster gets us through disaster free.

It got freezing again, but at Willow Springs we rested a few days and got our health all the way up for the next stage.

After this we took the longer and easier trail to get around the desert, and spirits are still very high, and we are almost done with Wyoming.

We lose a few more chickens (we bought one at Bridger so 3/6 are still alive), and a rest at Soda Springs gets us ready for Idaho.

The beginning of Idaho is very hard and dry, so this will be… We finally have good weather! A thunderstorm saves us from dehydration, as we zoom through Idaho and flourish.

After a great fishing trip we are halfway through July and are over 1,600 miles in with spirits and health great for our remaining four members. G’Nort Major Disaster, Big Sir, and Cluemaster all have a great shot.

This is where I saw we had over 1,500 pounds of meat, so big meals from now on.

Before we got to Fort Boise we found a new problem, sweltering heat. Earlier it was freezing, and now it is boiling. The weather is trying to kill us.

After that we wait for a terrible river to get better, but it got worse. No issues as Major Disaster refuses to live up to his name.

Then Oregon itself was very easy. With so much food we rested whenever we felt like it, and we slowly got there with the only problem being Cluemaster cannot fix anything to save his life. With no spare wheels we really felt worried, but they all held, as we made it to The Dalles.

Unfortunatly Big Sir got dyssentery, but 6 days of rest made him all better.

Two chickens die right at the end, but I am sure their consistent egg supply kept us good.

From here we go over the Dalles and make it in perfect health for G’Nort, Major Disaster, Clue Master, and Big Sir.




As that final scores shows the JLant did shockingly well. Broke the default high score and even did better than The Robins. Apparently for a bunch of guys with no skills, horrible weather (and I went out of my way to make it even worse), and sickness they are really good on a trail.

Their morale was wonderful, and their method of taking longer but easier paths whenever possible resulted in good chemistry with their early departure date (it took over 7 months). They are great at living off the land. Their method of going fast in hard parts and resting at great water sources was wonderful for their health. For guys with no animal experience, their animals stayed in great shape and took care of their needs.

The only real weakness was their awful wagon maintenance, and since they bought spare supplies and never lost any, that never came back to haunt them.

That went shockingly well. Anybody have any requests for future themes?

Here is the full account

Summary

January 31, 1848

Here begins the journal of G’Nort, formerly a brickmaker. Tomorrow we leave Independence behind to begin our journey west to Oregon City. We must still purchase the supplies that our large farmwagon will hold to sustain us during our long trek.

February 1, 1848

Took advantage of the package deal offered to me. What a relief not to have to shop for all that individually!

Purchased 1 spare wagon axle, 1 spare wagon tongue, 1 spare wagon wheel, 1 wagon cover.

Purchased 11 oxen, 5 chickens.

Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 1 pair of boots, 2 pounds of butter, 5 pairs of long underwear.

Purchased 5 blankets, 1 checkers board and set, 1 deck of playing cards, 1 fishing pole, 1 flute, 1 harmonica, 10 10-lb. sacks of salt.

From now on, ten hours of travel per day.

We will eat fewer meals.

Nooned at Blue River.

The ice looks like it will hold the wagon… So across we go.

February 2, 1848

I have been hired as trail guide for the wagon train.

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

Mr. Lumare figured we would reach Westport today, and he was right.

Saw New Santa Fe today.

February 3, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

Today I saw Lone Elm.

February 4, 1848

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

We rested a while not far from Blue Mound.

February 6, 1848

Today our labors were rewarded with the sight of Kansas River.

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

February 7, 1848

Today we have traveled 100 miles.

Thank goodness we made it through the freezing Kansas River.

February 8, 1848

Today I saw Saint Mary’s Mission.

Heard some gunfire in the distance near Red Vermillion River. Much concern all around.

Decided to ford the river.

February 9, 1848

Reached another prominent landmark today: Scott Spring.

February 11, 1848

As expected, we made it to Alcove Spring today.

Poor Scrlet Skier is feeling rough from the cold.

February 13, 1848

Today our labors were rewarded with the sight of Big Blue River.

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

2 day rest at Alcove Spring fixes that.

February 14, 1848

Made an early start this morning; passed St. Joseph Road Junction.

February 16, 1848

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

February 17, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

We will increase our rations.

February 18, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

Enjoyed some good fiddle music today during our nooning near The Narrows.

February 19, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

February 21, 1848

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to wait for conditions to improve.

February 22, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 23, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 24, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 25, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 26, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 27, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 28, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

February 29, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

We spotted a group of strangers and decided it would be best to continue at a distance.

March 1, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

Today we drove our wagons and teams past “The Coast of Nebraska”.

We will have to eat less each day.

March 2, 1848

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 210 pounds of meat.

March 3, 1848

Mr. Lumare figured we would reach Fort Kearny today, and he was right.

Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits.

Purchased 1 30-foot length of chain.

March 5, 1848

Mighty Bru has a bad cold. We’re going to increase fluid intake.

With such cold weather, Scarlet Skie has frostbite. At this time, I will gradually warm affected area.

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

Heard some gunfire in the distance near Plum Creek. Much concern all around.

Considering all the cold injuries we seem really hardy.

March 7, 1848

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 8 pounds of meat.

March 9, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

March 10, 1848

Mighty Bru has a bad cold. We’re going to increase fluid intake.

March 11, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

We will eat better from now on.

March 12, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

March 13, 1848

A very sad day, Mighty Bru has died. We will provide a proper burial.

Poor Might Bruce. Well that grave is not going to dig intself in the frozen ground.

March 14, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

Saw a grave dug up by wolves near O’Fallon’s Bluffs–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!

March 15, 1848

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

March 19, 1848

Today I saw South Platte River.

March 22, 1848

The ice looks like it will hold the wagon… So across we go.

March 24, 1848

We tipped the wagon and lost 64 pounds of bacon; 6 pounds of cheese; 3 pounds of coffee beans; 1 10-lb. sack of cornmeal; and various other items.

Our wagon tipped over. We lost 21 pounds of bacon; 1 pound of cheese; 1 pound of coffee beans; 1 10-lb. sack of dried beans; and various other items.

March 25, 1848

Passed the five hundred mile mark today.

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

The animals are so exhausted they can’t continue. We plan to stop and rest awhile.

March 26, 1848

The animals are so exhausted they can’t continue. We plan to stop and rest awhile.

March 27, 1848

Scarlet Skie has the grippe. We’re going to increase fluid intake.

A thick fog rolled in today. Looks like we’ll slow down.

March 28, 1848

Mr. and Mrs. Billings came by for a visit today near Ash Hollow; had a very nice chat.

April 1, 1848

Scarlet Skie has the grippe. We’re going to rest here awhile.

April 5, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

April 6, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

Reached Courthouse and Jail Rocks about noon–about time!

April 7, 1848

It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

We were treated to a remarkably beautiful sunset near Chimney Rock.

April 8, 1848

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 8 pounds of meat.

April 9, 1848

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 133 pounds of meat.

April 10, 1848

Reached another prominent landmark today: Scotts Bluff.

We will be more frugal with our food.

April 11, 1848

Commenced early today; saw Robidoux Pass Trading Post.

Purchased 50 pounds of bacon, 1 blanket, 1 box of 20 bullets, 1 10-lb. sack of cornmeal, 1 5-lb. tin of crackers, 1 25-lb. keg of pickles.

April 12, 1848

We’re missing one of the oxen, and we decided to organize a search party.

We found the missing animal.

Scarlet Skie has cuts and abrasions. We’re going to treat with an antiseptic.

April 15, 1848

Scarlet Skier got cut up finding the missing ox.

April 16, 1848

Scarlet Skie has cuts and abrasions. We’re going to clean and dress the wounds.

Approached Laramie River today. Some people in our wagon train are very tired of the journey.

April 19, 1848

Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.

Saw Fort John today.

Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 1 pound of butter, 1 pound of celery, 1 hammer.

Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw Register Cliff.

Somehow all 5 chickens are still alive. Almost 700 miles in.

April 25, 1848

The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

The animals are exhausted and can’t continue. I’ve decided to stop and rest awhile.

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

April 26, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

Spotted a group of strangers. We decided to continue at a distance.

We rested a while not far from Ayers Natural Bridge.

April 27, 1848

We lost a chicken today.

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

April 28, 1848

A very sad day, Scarlet Skie died. We will provide a proper burial.

Terrible fog during the early part of the day. We chose to continue as usual.

Went gathering. We found edible Rose hips, edible Sunflower seeds, edible Burdock roots and edible Plantain leaves.

April 29, 1848

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

April 30, 1848

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

Arrived at North Platte River, despite some “help” from Nicholas J. Tillman.

Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.

Reached Mormon Ferry Trading Post. Strangely beautiful country.

Purchased 35 pounds of bacon, 1 5-lb. tin of biscuits, 1 pound of butter.

May 1, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

In good spirits today; got as far as Emigrant Gap.

May 3, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

Came to Willow Springs.

May 5, 1848

In Wyoming, and it is still cold. At Willow Spring we got our remaing members’ health up.

May 6, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

May 7, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

Happened upon a fresh grave near Independence Rock. A reminder of the hazards we all face on the this journey.

Saw an empty wagon abandoned on the trail today near Devil’s Gate. If it could talk, what stories it might tell!

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 109 pounds of meat.

May 9, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 9 pounds of fish.

May 10, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

Mr. and Mrs. Billings came by for a visit today near Split Rock; had a very nice chat.

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 77 pounds of meat.

May 11, 1848

Today we have traveled for 100 days.

Came to Three Crossings.

May 12, 1848

We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

Just heard that there’s quicksand ahead. Looks like we’ll continue as usual.

We had a oxen get caught in quicksand. Looks like we’ll continue.

Mr. and Mrs. Billings came by for a visit today near Three Crossings; had a very nice chat.

Found ourselves at First Sweetwater River Crossing this day. Got a nasty splinter in my thumb, but extracted it without too much difficulty.

Fording the river looks to be our best option.

In good spirits today; got as far as Second Sweetwater River Crossing.

Fording the river looks to be our best option.

Saw a grave dug up by wolves near Third Sweetwater River Crossing–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!

Decided to ford the river.

Tried deep sand route. Immediatly saw that was a mistake and turned around.

May 13, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 189 pounds of meat.

May 14, 1848

Today we saw Ice Spring Slough. How sublime it appears by moonlight.

May 15, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 16, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 17, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 18, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 62 pounds of meat.

May 19, 1848

Encamped a while near Final Sweetwater River Crossing.

Decided to ford the river.

May 20, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

Today we drove our wagons and teams past South Pass.

We made it through the rockies and only lost a chicken. Still have four more.

May 21, 1848

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

Today we drove our wagons and teams past Pacific Springs.

May 22, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

May 23, 1848

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

This morning it was very foggy. We decided to continue as usual.

We were treated to a remarkably beautiful sunset near Dry Sandy.

Passed “Parting of the Ways” today.

May 24, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

May 25, 1848

We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

May 26, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

May 27, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

May 28, 1848

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

Made an early start this morning; passed Green River.

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

May 29, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 30, 1848

Today we have traveled 1,000 miles!

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

May 31, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

The trail continues to provide wonders and surprises! Today we made it to Church Butte.

June 1, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.

Sang and told stories around the noon campfire near Name Rock.

June 2, 1848

The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

Arrived at Fort Bridger.

Purchased 1 chicken.

Purchased 65 pounds of bacon, 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 2 pounds of butter, 2 pounds of celery, 2 pounds of cheese, 1 25-lb. keg of pickles.

Purchased 1 lantern.

June 5, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

June 11, 1848

Found ourselves at Grave Spring this day. Got a nasty splinter in my thumb, but extracted it without too much difficulty.

June 12, 1848

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 147 pounds of meat.

June 13, 1848

Passed West End of the Sublette Cutoff about noon.

June 14, 1848

Today came to Thomas Fork.

Went gathering. We found edible Prairie Poppymallow roots, edible Groundplum pods and edible Plantain leaves.

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

Arrived at Smith’s Trading Post today.

Purchased 2 pounds of cheese, 2 20-lb. sacks of potatoes.

June 16, 1848

We lost a chicken today.

June 17, 1848

We’ve come upon an area with bad mosquitoes. We will continue.

Today we drove our wagons and teams past Soda Springs.

June 19, 1848

Encamped a while near Sheep Rock.

Almost to Idaho. 2 day rest at Soda Springs to keep us ready.

June 22, 1848

The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.

June 23, 1848

We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 210 pounds of meat.

June 24, 1848

A chicken died today.

June 26, 1848

A severe thunderstorm made travel difficult today. We figured we would continue as usual.

After much travail, we came to Fort Hall.

Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 1 box of 20 bullets.

No water. Nevermind, thunderstorm saves us.

June 28, 1848

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 6 pounds of fish.

June 30, 1848

Today we drove our wagons and teams past American Falls.

July 1, 1848

Passed some time near Raft River.

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

Made our way past California Trail Junction late today. Trail could be better.

July 2, 1848

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 7 pounds of fish.

July 4, 1848

Today is Independence Day and we’ve decided to continue.

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 7 pounds of fish.

July 7, 1848

Terrible fog during the early part of the day. We chose to continue as usual.

Another step on the trail; today we reached Caldron Linn.

July 8, 1848

Cluemaster has typhoid fever. We’re hoping to try to control the fever.

July 12, 1848

Today we passed Rock Creek.

Fording the river looks to be our best option.

July 13, 1848

We came upon some fallen rocks on the trail and decided to continue over the obstruction.

One of our wagon axles broke, and I decided to try to repair it.

We were unable to make the repair.

We were able to replace it from supplies.

July 14, 1848

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 16 pounds of fish.

July 15, 1848

Saw buzzards circling today not too far from Kanaka Rapids. If I were superstitious, I’d call it a bad omen.

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 4 pounds of fish.

July 16, 1848

Every day our journey comes closer to its end. Today we made it to Thousand Springs.

Rested for a time near Upper Salmon Falls.

We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 146 pounds of fish.

July 17, 1848

We will eat better from now on.

At upper Salmon Falls we caught 150 pounds of fish. Eating good now.

July 19, 1848

Had a lengthy chat with Mr. Lumare today near Three Islands.

Saw buzzards circling today not too far from Snake River. If I were superstitious, I’d call it a bad omen.

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

July 21, 1848

Another step on the trail; today we reached Hot Springs.

July 22, 1848

Mr. Tillman claims it’s the Oregon Territory up ahead, but the guidebook says it’s Register Rock.

July 23, 1848

It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.

We will eat fewer meals.

Much grumbling today about Nick Tillman near Bonneville Point.

July 24, 1848

We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

We will have heartier meals.

July 25, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

July 26, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

July 27, 1848

The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

July 28, 1848

The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.

July 29, 1848

It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.

We endured an extremely severe thunderstorm today. We decided to continue as usual.

Earlier it was freezing, and now it is boiling.

July 30, 1848

It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.

The animals are exhausted and can’t continue. I’ve decided to stop and rest awhile.

August 3, 1848

Saw buzzards circling today not too far from Fort Boise. If I were superstitious, I’d call it a bad omen.

August 5, 1848

Purchased 3 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 2 20-lb. sacks of potatoes.

Traveled past Final Snake River Crossing this afternoon.

Few hundred miles from destination. Rested up and stocked up.

August 6, 1848

Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

Conditions got worse after waiting for them to get better, but we still made it.

August 7, 1848

Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw East Cow Hollow.

Saw a mountain lion not far from Lytle Pass.

Saw some Indians in the distance not far from Malheur River. No incident, but some concern.

Decided to ford the river.

August 8, 1848

A thick fog rolled in today. Looks like we’ll continue as usual.

August 10, 1848

The animals are so exhausted they can’t continue. We plan to stop and rest awhile.

August 11, 1848

The trail brought us to Farewell Bend today.

August 13, 1848

Today I saw Burnt River Canyon.

August 14, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

August 15, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

Our path was blocked by fallen rocks on the trail. We decided to try to clear the path.

August 16, 1848

We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

August 17, 1848

We were treated to a remarkably beautiful sunset near Flagstaff Hill.

August 19, 1848

We have been traveling for 200 days, today. Will we never arrive?

Our expectations of reaching Grande Ronde River were fulfilled this day.

Decided to ford the river.

August 22, 1848

We saw a small party of coyotes today, just a mile or so west of Emigrant Springs.

Much grumbling today about Nick Tillman near Deadman Pass.

August 23, 1848

It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.

Reached Doe Canyon.

August 26, 1848

Today we saw Whitman Mission Ruins. What a sight!

August 27, 1848

Saw a grave dug up by wolves near Fort Walla Walla–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!

Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 2 pounds of cheese, 1 10-lb. sack of flour, 2 25-lb. kegs of pickles.

August 30, 1848

We lost a chicken today.

Heard news of a murder and hanging last night near Trail Junction at the Umatilla River. Enough to send shivers down one’s spine.

August 31, 1848

Made an early start this morning; passed Echo Meadows.

September 1, 1848

We lost a chicken today.

September 7, 1848

Learned today that Major Disas has dysentery. I plan to rest here awhile.

September 8, 1848

Broke a wagon axle today. We will have to try to repair it.

We were unable to make the repair.

We were able to replace it from supplies.

September 9, 1848

Today we passed Four Mile Canyon.

No more spare wheels.

September 11, 1848

Today we saw McDonald Ford of the John Day River. What a sight!

Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.

September 13, 1848

Today we saw Biggs Junction. What a sight!

Misplaced my guidebook at Deschutes River today. Luckily we found it before leaving.

Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.

September 14, 1848

The wagon train reached The Dalles this day.

September 16, 1848

Came to McCord Creek. Had a talk with some of the other folks in the wagon train.

Arrived today at Oregon City!! At last we have reached our destination! Truly this is the land of opportunity!

November 21, 1848

Obtained a land deed today from the county for 957 acres. Now I can begin to build my new life!

Final Score: 16548

November 22, 1848

In 1848, G’Nort settled on 957 acres of land along the banks of Oregon’s Willamette River.

After several years of only moderate success on the farm, G’Nort decided to move to the growing population center of Oregon City, establishing a small business that proved more stable and satisfying.

During and after the Civil War, G’Nort became active in raising money for the widows of soldiers and disabled veterans. For these and other civic activities, G’Nort was awarded a citation and commemorative plaque by the President of the United StateJanuary 31, 1848
Here begins the journal of G’Nort, formerly a brickmaker. Tomorrow we leave Independence behind to begin our journey west to Oregon City. We must still purchase the supplies that our large farmwagon will hold to sustain us during our long trek.

February 1, 1848
Took advantage of the package deal offered to me. What a relief not to have to shop for all that individually!
Purchased 1 spare wagon axle, 1 spare wagon tongue, 1 spare wagon wheel, 1 wagon cover.
Purchased 11 oxen, 5 chickens.
Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 1 pair of boots, 2 pounds of butter, 5 pairs of long underwear.
Purchased 5 blankets, 1 checkers board and set, 1 deck of playing cards, 1 fishing pole, 1 flute, 1 harmonica, 10 10-lb. sacks of salt.
From now on, ten hours of travel per day.
We will eat fewer meals.
Nooned at Blue River.
The ice looks like it will hold the wagon… So across we go.

February 2, 1848
I have been hired as trail guide for the wagon train.
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
Mr. Lumare figured we would reach Westport today, and he was right.
Saw New Santa Fe today.

February 3, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Today I saw Lone Elm.

February 4, 1848
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
We rested a while not far from Blue Mound.

February 6, 1848
Today our labors were rewarded with the sight of Kansas River.
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

February 7, 1848
Today we have traveled 100 miles.

Thank goodness we made it through the freezing Kansas River.

February 8, 1848
Today I saw Saint Mary’s Mission.
Heard some gunfire in the distance near Red Vermillion River. Much concern all around.
Decided to ford the river.

February 9, 1848
Reached another prominent landmark today: Scott Spring.

February 11, 1848
As expected, we made it to Alcove Spring today.

Poor Scrlet Skier is feeling rough from the cold.

February 13, 1848
Today our labors were rewarded with the sight of Big Blue River.
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

2 day rest at Alcove Spring fixes that.

February 14, 1848
Made an early start this morning; passed St. Joseph Road Junction.

February 16, 1848
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

February 17, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
We will increase our rations.

February 18, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Enjoyed some good fiddle music today during our nooning near The Narrows.

February 19, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

February 21, 1848
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to wait for conditions to improve.

February 22, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 23, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 24, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 25, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 26, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 27, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.

February 28, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to wait for conditions to improve.
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

February 29, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
We spotted a group of strangers and decided it would be best to continue at a distance.

March 1, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Today we drove our wagons and teams past “The Coast of Nebraska”.
We will have to eat less each day.

March 2, 1848
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 210 pounds of meat.

March 3, 1848
Mr. Lumare figured we would reach Fort Kearny today, and he was right.
Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits.
Purchased 1 30-foot length of chain.

March 5, 1848
Mighty Bru has a bad cold. We’re going to increase fluid intake.
With such cold weather, Scarlet Skie has frostbite. At this time, I will gradually warm affected area.
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Heard some gunfire in the distance near Plum Creek. Much concern all around.

Considering all the cold injuries we seem really hardy.

March 7, 1848
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 8 pounds of meat.

March 9, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

March 10, 1848
Mighty Bru has a bad cold. We’re going to increase fluid intake.

March 11, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
We will eat better from now on.

March 12, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

March 13, 1848
A very sad day, Mighty Bru has died. We will provide a proper burial.

Poor Might Bruce. Well that grave is not going to dig intself in the frozen ground.

March 14, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Saw a grave dug up by wolves near O’Fallon’s Bluffs–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!

March 15, 1848
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.

March 19, 1848
Today I saw South Platte River.

March 22, 1848
The ice looks like it will hold the wagon… So across we go.

March 24, 1848
We tipped the wagon and lost 64 pounds of bacon; 6 pounds of cheese; 3 pounds of coffee beans; 1 10-lb. sack of cornmeal; and various other items.
Our wagon tipped over. We lost 21 pounds of bacon; 1 pound of cheese; 1 pound of coffee beans; 1 10-lb. sack of dried beans; and various other items.

March 25, 1848
Passed the five hundred mile mark today.
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
The animals are so exhausted they can’t continue. We plan to stop and rest awhile.

March 26, 1848
The animals are so exhausted they can’t continue. We plan to stop and rest awhile.

March 27, 1848
Scarlet Skie has the grippe. We’re going to increase fluid intake.
A thick fog rolled in today. Looks like we’ll slow down.

March 28, 1848
Mr. and Mrs. Billings came by for a visit today near Ash Hollow; had a very nice chat.

April 1, 1848
Scarlet Skie has the grippe. We’re going to rest here awhile.

April 5, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.

April 6, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
Reached Courthouse and Jail Rocks about noon–about time!

April 7, 1848
It is mighty cold today. We’re going to continue as usual.
We were treated to a remarkably beautiful sunset near Chimney Rock.

April 8, 1848
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 8 pounds of meat.

April 9, 1848
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 133 pounds of meat.

April 10, 1848
Reached another prominent landmark today: Scotts Bluff.
We will be more frugal with our food.

April 11, 1848
Commenced early today; saw Robidoux Pass Trading Post.
Purchased 50 pounds of bacon, 1 blanket, 1 box of 20 bullets, 1 10-lb. sack of cornmeal, 1 5-lb. tin of crackers, 1 25-lb. keg of pickles.

April 12, 1848
We’re missing one of the oxen, and we decided to organize a search party.
We found the missing animal.
Scarlet Skie has cuts and abrasions. We’re going to treat with an antiseptic.

April 15, 1848

Scarlet Skier got cut up finding the missing ox.

April 16, 1848
Scarlet Skie has cuts and abrasions. We’re going to clean and dress the wounds.
Approached Laramie River today. Some people in our wagon train are very tired of the journey.

April 19, 1848
Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.
Saw Fort John today.
Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 1 pound of butter, 1 pound of celery, 1 hammer.
Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw Register Cliff.

Somehow all 5 chickens are still alive. Almost 700 miles in.

April 25, 1848
The weather turned very cold, and I decided to continue as usual.
The animals are exhausted and can’t continue. I’ve decided to stop and rest awhile.
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

April 26, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
Spotted a group of strangers. We decided to continue at a distance.
We rested a while not far from Ayers Natural Bridge.

April 27, 1848
We lost a chicken today.
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

April 28, 1848
A very sad day, Scarlet Skie died. We will provide a proper burial.
Terrible fog during the early part of the day. We chose to continue as usual.
Went gathering. We found edible Rose hips, edible Sunflower seeds, edible Burdock roots and edible Plantain leaves.

April 29, 1848
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

April 30, 1848
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
Arrived at North Platte River, despite some “help” from Nicholas J. Tillman.
Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.
Reached Mormon Ferry Trading Post. Strangely beautiful country.
Purchased 35 pounds of bacon, 1 5-lb. tin of biscuits, 1 pound of butter.

May 1, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
In good spirits today; got as far as Emigrant Gap.

May 3, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
Came to Willow Springs.

May 5, 1848

In Wyoming, and it is still cold. At Willow Spring we got our remaing members’ health up.

May 6, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

May 7, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
Happened upon a fresh grave near Independence Rock. A reminder of the hazards we all face on the this journey.
Saw an empty wagon abandoned on the trail today near Devil’s Gate. If it could talk, what stories it might tell!
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 109 pounds of meat.

May 9, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 9 pounds of fish.

May 10, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
Mr. and Mrs. Billings came by for a visit today near Split Rock; had a very nice chat.
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 77 pounds of meat.

May 11, 1848
Today we have traveled for 100 days.
Came to Three Crossings.

May 12, 1848
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.
Just heard that there’s quicksand ahead. Looks like we’ll continue as usual.
We had a oxen get caught in quicksand. Looks like we’ll continue.
Mr. and Mrs. Billings came by for a visit today near Three Crossings; had a very nice chat.
Found ourselves at First Sweetwater River Crossing this day. Got a nasty splinter in my thumb, but extracted it without too much difficulty.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.
In good spirits today; got as far as Second Sweetwater River Crossing.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.
Saw a grave dug up by wolves near Third Sweetwater River Crossing–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!
Decided to ford the river.

Tried deep sand route. Immediatly saw that was a mistake and turned around.

May 13, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 189 pounds of meat.

May 14, 1848
Today we saw Ice Spring Slough. How sublime it appears by moonlight.

May 15, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 16, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 17, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 18, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 62 pounds of meat.

May 19, 1848
Encamped a while near Final Sweetwater River Crossing.
Decided to ford the river.

May 20, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
Today we drove our wagons and teams past South Pass.

We made it through the rockies and only lost a chicken. Still have four more.

May 21, 1848
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
Today we drove our wagons and teams past Pacific Springs.

May 22, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

May 23, 1848
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
This morning it was very foggy. We decided to continue as usual.
We were treated to a remarkably beautiful sunset near Dry Sandy.
Passed “Parting of the Ways” today.

May 24, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.

May 25, 1848
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.

May 26, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

May 27, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

May 28, 1848
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
Made an early start this morning; passed Green River.
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

May 29, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

May 30, 1848
Today we have traveled 1,000 miles!
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.

May 31, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The trail continues to provide wonders and surprises! Today we made it to Church Butte.

June 1, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.
Sang and told stories around the noon campfire near Name Rock.

June 2, 1848
The other wagons are churning up thick dust. We’re going to continue as usual.
Arrived at Fort Bridger.
Purchased 1 chicken.
Purchased 65 pounds of bacon, 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 2 pounds of butter, 2 pounds of celery, 2 pounds of cheese, 1 25-lb. keg of pickles.
Purchased 1 lantern.

June 5, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

June 11, 1848
Found ourselves at Grave Spring this day. Got a nasty splinter in my thumb, but extracted it without too much difficulty.

June 12, 1848
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 147 pounds of meat.

June 13, 1848
Passed West End of the Sublette Cutoff about noon.

June 14, 1848
Today came to Thomas Fork.
Went gathering. We found edible Prairie Poppymallow roots, edible Groundplum pods and edible Plantain leaves.
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.
Arrived at Smith’s Trading Post today.
Purchased 2 pounds of cheese, 2 20-lb. sacks of potatoes.

June 16, 1848
We lost a chicken today.

June 17, 1848
We’ve come upon an area with bad mosquitoes. We will continue.
Today we drove our wagons and teams past Soda Springs.

June 19, 1848
Encamped a while near Sheep Rock.

Almost to Idaho. 2 day rest at Soda Springs to keep us ready.

June 22, 1848
The fog is as thick as pea soup. I reckon we’ll continue as usual.

June 23, 1848
We stopped along the trail to hunt. We obtained 210 pounds of meat.

June 24, 1848
A chicken died today.

June 26, 1848
A severe thunderstorm made travel difficult today. We figured we would continue as usual.
After much travail, we came to Fort Hall.
Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 1 box of 20 bullets.

No water. Nevermind, thunderstorm saves us.

June 28, 1848
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 6 pounds of fish.

June 30, 1848
Today we drove our wagons and teams past American Falls.

July 1, 1848
Passed some time near Raft River.
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.
Made our way past California Trail Junction late today. Trail could be better.

July 2, 1848
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 7 pounds of fish.

July 4, 1848
Today is Independence Day and we’ve decided to continue.
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 7 pounds of fish.

July 7, 1848
Terrible fog during the early part of the day. We chose to continue as usual.
Another step on the trail; today we reached Caldron Linn.

July 8, 1848
Cluemaster has typhoid fever. We’re hoping to try to control the fever.

July 12, 1848
Today we passed Rock Creek.
Fording the river looks to be our best option.

July 13, 1848
We came upon some fallen rocks on the trail and decided to continue over the obstruction.
One of our wagon axles broke, and I decided to try to repair it.
We were unable to make the repair.
We were able to replace it from supplies.

July 14, 1848
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 16 pounds of fish.

July 15, 1848
Saw buzzards circling today not too far from Kanaka Rapids. If I were superstitious, I’d call it a bad omen.
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 4 pounds of fish.

July 16, 1848
Every day our journey comes closer to its end. Today we made it to Thousand Springs.
Rested for a time near Upper Salmon Falls.
We stopped along the trail to fish. We obtained 146 pounds of fish.

July 17, 1848
We will eat better from now on.

At upper Salmon Falls we caught 150 pounds of fish. Eating good now.

July 19, 1848
Had a lengthy chat with Mr. Lumare today near Three Islands.
Saw buzzards circling today not too far from Snake River. If I were superstitious, I’d call it a bad omen.
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

July 21, 1848
Another step on the trail; today we reached Hot Springs.

July 22, 1848
Mr. Tillman claims it’s the Oregon Territory up ahead, but the guidebook says it’s Register Rock.

July 23, 1848
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.
We will eat fewer meals.
Much grumbling today about Nick Tillman near Bonneville Point.

July 24, 1848
We hope for some rain to settle the dust. For the time being, we’ll continue as usual.
We will have heartier meals.

July 25, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

July 26, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

July 27, 1848
The eternal dust of the wagons ahead of us is most troublesome. We will continue as usual.

July 28, 1848
The dust from other wagons has gotten bad. We decided to continue as usual.
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.

July 29, 1848
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.
We endured an extremely severe thunderstorm today. We decided to continue as usual.

Earlier it was freezing, and now it is boiling.

July 30, 1848
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.
The animals are exhausted and can’t continue. I’ve decided to stop and rest awhile.

August 3, 1848
Saw buzzards circling today not too far from Fort Boise. If I were superstitious, I’d call it a bad omen.

August 5, 1848
Purchased 3 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 2 20-lb. sacks of potatoes.
Traveled past Final Snake River Crossing this afternoon.

Few hundred miles from destination. Rested up and stocked up.

August 6, 1848
Decided to caulk the wagon and float it across.

Conditions got worse after waiting for them to get better, but we still made it.

August 7, 1848
Sore feet today, but I’ll manage. Saw East Cow Hollow.
Saw a mountain lion not far from Lytle Pass.
Saw some Indians in the distance not far from Malheur River. No incident, but some concern.
Decided to ford the river.

August 8, 1848
A thick fog rolled in today. Looks like we’ll continue as usual.

August 10, 1848
The animals are so exhausted they can’t continue. We plan to stop and rest awhile.

August 11, 1848
The trail brought us to Farewell Bend today.

August 13, 1848
Today I saw Burnt River Canyon.

August 14, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

August 15, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.
Our path was blocked by fallen rocks on the trail. We decided to try to clear the path.

August 16, 1848
We’re nearly choking on the dust of the trail. We’ve decided to continue as usual.

August 17, 1848
We were treated to a remarkably beautiful sunset near Flagstaff Hill.

August 19, 1848
We have been traveling for 200 days, today. Will we never arrive?
Our expectations of reaching Grande Ronde River were fulfilled this day.
Decided to ford the river.

August 22, 1848
We saw a small party of coyotes today, just a mile or so west of Emigrant Springs.
Much grumbling today about Nick Tillman near Deadman Pass.

August 23, 1848
It’s mighty hot today. We’re going to continue as usual.
Reached Doe Canyon.

August 26, 1848
Today we saw Whitman Mission Ruins. What a sight!

August 27, 1848
Saw a grave dug up by wolves near Fort Walla Walla–bones scattered about. A most distressing sight!
Purchased 2 5-lb. tins of biscuits, 2 pounds of cheese, 1 10-lb. sack of flour, 2 25-lb. kegs of pickles.

August 30, 1848
We lost a chicken today.
Heard news of a murder and hanging last night near Trail Junction at the Umatilla River. Enough to send shivers down one’s spine.

August 31, 1848
Made an early start this morning; passed Echo Meadows.

September 1, 1848
We lost a chicken today.

September 7, 1848
Learned today that Major Disas has dysentery. I plan to rest here awhile.

September 8, 1848
Broke a wagon axle today. We will have to try to repair it.
We were unable to make the repair.
We were able to replace it from supplies.

September 9, 1848
Today we passed Four Mile Canyon.

No more spare wheels.

September 11, 1848
Today we saw McDonald Ford of the John Day River. What a sight!
Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.

September 13, 1848
Today we saw Biggs Junction. What a sight!
Misplaced my guidebook at Deschutes River today. Luckily we found it before leaving.
Caulk the wagon and float it across, that is the way to go.

September 14, 1848
The wagon train reached The Dalles this day.

September 16, 1848
Came to McCord Creek. Had a talk with some of the other folks in the wagon train.
Arrived today at Oregon City!! At last we have reached our destination! Truly this is the land of opportunity!

November 21, 1848
Obtained a land deed today from the county for 957 acres. Now I can begin to build my new life!
Final Score: 16548

November 22, 1848
In 1848, G’Nort settled on 957 acres of land along the banks of Oregon’s Willamette River.
After several years of only moderate success on the farm, G’Nort decided to move to the growing population center of Oregon City, establishing a small business that proved more stable and satisfying.
During and after the Civil War, G’Nort became active in raising money for the widows of soldiers and disabled veterans. For these and other civic activities, G’Nort was awarded a citation and commemorative plaque by the President of the United States.

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I audibly gasped when the Mighty Bruce died. What a blow to morale! And the Skier!

“Unfortunately Big Sir got dysentery” Lmao

Major Disaster seemed pretty clutch and Yowsa! High score! (against default and Robins anyway)

That was a lot of fun, thanks Bats!

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You’re Welcome.

Taking no skills gives you bonus points, so that might have been the difference between the JLant and the Robins. It depends on how much that would have saved on supplies (or if the expensive medicine skill would have saved somebody).

In game Morale is only lessened by death if you do not bury them.

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