Knight Terrors

If you’re at all curious, Selina’s sister was introduced in her first mini-series made right after and is a semi-sequel to Batman: Year One, also called “Her Sister’s Keeper.”

She also played a fairly big role initially in Ed Brubaker’s iconic run on Catwoman.

I didn’t hate the art, but it is kind of funny in that I’ve seen people describe Batman in this as “Twink Bruce Wayne” and I can’t unsee it. I mean…I’m not complaining, but it is funny. :rofl:

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That page was a big part of the issue I had - look at Selina’s face in that second panel. It’s just…off. If I didn’t know that was her I wouldn’t recognize her.

Thanks for the heads up on where to find more about her sister. Always up for reading more comics and learning about “new” characters (new to me).

If any of you are enjoying Knight Terrors and want three free Knight Terrors comics as NFTs that you can read, collect or even sell go to this link and submit your information. They’ll send you a code good for one free DC3 Super Power Pack that’ll allow you to mint three Knight Terrors comics as NFTs.

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It’s been OK, not something I’m going to reread many times.

I now want to see Damian in a fedora.

Lois’ nightmare has been the best one.

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You’re very welcome @RG02. :purple_heart: Plz enjoy! :hugs:

I’m going to check out Ivy and Wonder Woman first tonight (shocking, I know :laughing:)

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Somewhat irrelevant to the conversation here, but has Dreamer been featured in any issues so far? Seems like for someone who jumps into dreams to be important in this event.

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Oooh, excellent question, @Samsonkillingtime! :thinking: I haven’t read enough to speak on this, but that does seem like a huge missed opportunity. :purple_heart:

:thought_balloon: Wonders if @Mae knows any rumors?

Ps. Here’s a few more variants, everyone.

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That would be amazing but I imagine she’s too low-profile still for a big event. Maybe a quick cameo.

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Ivy was interesting. I have still to read Wonder Woman.

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Oh yeah, very cool

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maybe they didn’t want things to seem to easy sort of like in the lord of the rings where they could have taken the eagles but they didn’t

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I’ve only got access to the Ultra selections. But, it’s 𝐒𝐎 𝐆𝐎𝐎𝐃!!! Love the storylines, the art. I love how creative they are with the specific “boogeyman “ to each character. Some are obvious? But, it’s the right decision!!!

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This Zatanna cover is freaking me out in all the right ways. :heavy_heart_exclamation: :rabbit2:

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bruce looks like one of the old movie actors here …Tony Curtis

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I plan to post more Knight Terrors reactions here. I especially want to talk about the Poison Ivy issue, which I loved. For now, though, here are my reactions to Knight Terrors: Action Comics #1 and Knight Terrors: Superman #1 which I originally posted to the Superman thread:

The other Super-Family title that really blew me away this month was Knight Terrors: Action Comics #1, or, more specifically, Leah William’s Power Girl story in that issue. I’ve been grading the few Knight Terrors books I’ve been reading on how well they hit the psychological horror aspect of a nightmare. I’m not so much interested in the slasher horror as much as the horror created by your own psyche talking to you in images. Williams knocks this out of the park. The story puts into images both the in-continuity horrors as well as the meta horrors that Power Girl is put through. It starts with a “dream lover” who is obsessed with and negatively driven by Power Girl’s looks which could be commentary on how her beauty has been exploited over the years. We move into her parents trying to abandon her because she makes “a complete mess of things,” and when she tries to stop them she ends up shattering her mother to pieces. That continues the theme of how Paige has been driving people away because she believes bad things will happen to them if they’re around her. We move on to a scene with Kal-L who treats her like a Superman robot who can be replaced with a different version a la Supergirl. Because she feels she has no place in the world and that she’s putting on an act in place of that, we get her on stage without knowing her lines. The nightmare keeps rebooting like a computer program or JUST LIKE HOW DC CONSTATLY REBOOTS HER ORIGINS. This was masterful use of the tie-in gimmick. I’ve said before how Leah Williams is good, but, damn, Leah Williams is good.

I also enjoyed Phillip Kennedy Johnson’s Cyborg Superman story in this issue for what it was. It didn’t quite hit the psychological horror heights of Power Girl’s story. Yet, I enjoyed seeing the bonding session between members of the Super-Family. It’s not yet clear whether Henshaw is actually in their nightmare or if he is just an Insomnia construct. However, if it is the real Henshaw, this is likely possible because he’s in the Phantom Zone and inhabitants of that realm can interact with the outside world telepathically on occasion.

I was a tad let down by Knight Terrors: Superman #1. Again, I’m grading these on psychological horror and this issue didn’t do anything new in that department. It pretty much played the “you’ll outlive everyone you love” note which we’ve seen many times before and didn’t offer much new in that regard. I liked seeing the visual Silver Age references and the issue wasn’t terrible. It was just neither as fun as Williamson’s monthly Superman stories have been nor as playful with the psychological horror as my favorite Knight-Terror tie-ins have been. I’ll see how it ends, but I’m lukewarm on it so far. Also, it’s not clear if Supergirl really entered Kal’s nightmare or if she’s an Insomnia construct. However, if it is really Kara then maybe she also has Peej’s astral punch ability…? We’ll see.

Update: Since reading Knight Terrors: Shazam #2, I now know that heroes being able to enter one another’s dreams is not connected to the astral punch ability that Power Girl acquired. It’s just something that can be done… I guess.

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I just looked at the rankings for comic books the event seems to be doing well

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What my fellow last son of an extinguished alien culture said.

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wonder women was pretty good I liked it

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So Far I’ve read what is on Ultra and the Art has overall been quite fantastic, and i love seeing Zee and Deadman get some attention, overall though and that may change as it goes along it seems to be more a series of one-shots with a DC eleseworld feel to me. Not that it is a bad thing but for events like this, I prefer some linking to current continuity and comics being published. however as most events publishing deadlines fail during their run and regular issues resume before they are finished in many cases, perhaps it feeling like a DC elseworld tale isn’t a bad thing.

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Alright, I’m going to cover Knight Terrors: Superman #2, and, as I mentioned in the Superman Thread, I thought it was “meh.” Again, I’ve been grading these on how well they deal with the psychological horror factor. Maybe it’s unfair to ask the writers of these tie-ins to play in that sandbox since it’s not necessarily a given, but… nah… I don’t think it is too much to ask. The setting of a nightmare does suggest psychological horror or… at least the promise of something surreal. If you fall short of the opportunities that provides then I think the criticism is fair. When it comes to Knight Terrors: Superman, the fact that I think there’s more to unpack from these two panels in Superman #165 from Nov., 1963


than there is from two full issues of Knight Terrors: Superman isn’t great and I kind of hoped for more.

Like I mentioned in my summary of issue #1, Williamson plays with Superman’s fear that he will outlive the people he loves. To be fair, some depth to that is added here by connecting the fear to the destruction of the planet Krypton. Superman’s fear of losing the planet Earth and his loved ones along with it is rooted in the trauma of the destruction of Krypton. Again, this is nothing new, but it shows that Williamson gets the depth of the fear he’s playing with. Yet, it’s mostly communicated using a “reaper” Superman that I’m sure McFarlane will be creating a pretty cool action figure of, but… doesn’t really make me feel like he made the most out of exploring the trauma.

There’s also some suggestion that Superman is afraid of what he doesn’t know about Metropolis from before he arrived. This was communicated with a western setting, but did more to set up further story arcs in his Superman run than it did to really provide much horror here. I think my favorite part was when Supergirl was being chased by the former versions of herself from the older comics. That may have been meta commentary about how Kara is constantly being (perhaps unfairly) compared to her earlier characterizations.

All in all, though, I can’t help but feel that this was a wasted opportunity to explore the depth of Kal’s traumas and fears. I think it’s also kind of weird that that’s the case since Williamson is writing the main Knight Terrors title, so, presumably, this was his idea. I really enjoyed Tom Reilly’s art and I wouldn’t exactly say the two issues were bad. However, they did let me down considering the promise of a nightmare setting and the fact that I’ve seen other writers take full advantage of the opportunities that presents. The fact that, in my eyes, Williamson didn’t provides the first time I’ve felt underwhelmed since he started writing Superman.

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I’m rating them on if I had fun or not

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