DC History Club: The History of DCU Pride Characters and Creators - All Profiles Available


:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Coagula. Created by transgender writer Rachel Pollack and given the name Kate Godwin after two of Pollacks transgender friends, Coagula is arguably the first true transgender superhero published by DC Comics. Coagula gained her ability to turn solids into liquids, and the reverse, after sleeping with Doom Patrol member Rebis (who you could argue is non-binary). She eventually joins the Patrol and adds a relationship with Robotman to her previous interest in women. The series also depicts Robotman dealing with the idea that his girlfriend is transgender. Although she was fridged by Doom Patrol’s next writer, Coagula deserves recognition as a truly ground breaking character.

Doom Patrol #70

3 Likes

These are great videos @msgtv, I totally want to take a class with her, and in a way we all have thanks to you! I’ve wanted to get a hold of a copy of “The Seduction of the Innocents,” for years, and they are available on Ebay, I just haven’t found one in my price range, but I want it my collection and want to read it, very badly.

Stan Lee, when asked about Whertham, would always say, paraphrasing Stan, that Whertham would point out 90% of kids in juvenile detention read comics, but they also drank milk, though he didn’t go after the dairy industry. Lol!

@stefanie.m as @msgtv points out, the code did have periods of revision, the first was in 1971, the famous Harry Osborn drug story in “Amazing Spider-Man 96-98.” Where the government ask Stan to do an anti-drug issue, so they did, then the code wouldn’t let Marvel print it, which was ridiculous, since it was against drug use.

From the Wikipedia about these issues:

Lee recalled in a 1998 interview:

I could understand them; they were like lawyers, people who take things literally and technically. The Code mentioned that you mustn’t mention drugs and, according to their rules, they were right. So I didn’t even get mad at them then. I said, ‘Screw it’ and just took the Code seal off for those three issues. Then we went back to the Code again. I never thought about the Code when I was writing a story, because basically I never wanted to do anything that was to my mind too violent or too sexy. I was aware that young people were reading these books, and had there not been a Code, I don’t think that I would have done the stories any differently.[4]

This lead to a loosing of restrictions in the '70’s, which is why you see all the horror titles from Marvel and DC in the Bronze age, and as has been pointed out, by '89 it was pretty much watered down. So that Northstar from “Alpha Flight,” could come out in the '90’s as one of the first, if not the first, openly gay superheros.

3 Likes

@discordia57 bringing it strong there. Never thought of Seduction as a collectors item but that would be a cool conversation starter. On Whertham, I just feel compelled to keep pointing out that he was lying. That’s not what his 2 gay young men patients said, but I guess he didn’t want to kill off Tarzan movies.

3 Likes

:rofl:

It’s a collectors item to me, as an arm chair comics historian. I feel like it’s something I should own and read, to be better versed in comic history. I’d also like to add to my previous post, I think it’s funny how quickly the code changed it’s self after the Spidy stories, so that in the same year, Denny O’Neil and Neil Adams were able to have a cover of GL/GA depicting Speedy shooting up! :laughing:

2 Likes

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Marguerite Bennett. This GLAAD nominated self-identified queer writer has been a dynamo at DC Comics and beyond. Starting with co-authoring a Batman Annual with Scott Synder, she started writing regularly the next year with Earth 2: World’s End. But, it was her launching the DC Bombshells comic universe that cemented her not only as a fantastic writer but an historically important proponent of Pride representation in comics. She wrote the series with the straight forward idea that “if you write stories that tell folks that queer people can live without shame, they just might grow up believing it.” She followed up with a stint helming Batwoman, and projects outside of DC including A Force, Josie and the Pussycats, and creator owned InSeXts. Stay tuned, because there’s no way Bennett is done yet.

dc b

DC Comics: Bombshells

Bombshells: United

Batwoman (2017)

1 Like

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: James Tynion IV. You see the name Tynion on a comic cover and you trust it’s going to be good. Tynion earned that trust with his DC work on Batman comics, including the IDW Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles crossovers, and an A+ run on Justice League Dark. Tynion can also be added to the growing list of successful writers introduced into the DCU by Scott Snyder. He has been nominated for Eisner and Harvey Awards, and won the 2016 GLAAD Media award for Outstanding Comic Book for his creator owned The Woods with IDW. Openly bisexual himself, Tynion enriches his stories with representation across the spectrum, including Batman’s new rival Ghosthunter.

Batman Eternal
Batman and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Justice League Dark

2 Likes

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Mariko Tamaki. This Canadian writer and artist made an indelible impact with her 2008 graphic novel Skim, drawn by her sometime collaborator and cousin Jillian Tamaki. This and subsequent works often explore ideas “about living in the moments of wrenching transition …[and] the conflicting need to belong and desire to resist.” Themes seemingly drawn from her own life and identity as a lesbian growing up in Canada. Tamaki joined the DC family with highly praised Supergirl: Being Super, Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass, and I am not Starfire. She has also written She Hulk and Lumberjanes novels, and is now currently writing Detective Comics.

HQ breaking glass

Supergirl: Being Super

2 Likes

For more on Mariko Tamaki, see the DC History Club’s look at Supergirl: Being Super and Her Creators

DC History Club: Supergirl: Being Super

My personal take is that Tamaki does a fantastic job building and making you care about the characters in her books. She’s also proving a standout writer of a more conventional superhero book with her current run of Detective Comics. Really like where she’s taking Batman, Huntress and the rest of Gotham in that series.
Also, there’s a copy of Breaking Glass in the house here. I just may have to borrow it.

3 Likes

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Marc Andreyko. In 2004, DC Comics relaunched Manhunter with a new hero and a writer that would prove capable of creating complex, entertaining, modern comic book super hero stories. If Marc Andreyko had stopped with creating Kate Spencer and an openly gay relationship for Obsidian he would have done enough to earn his spot in DC History as a prominent gay writer. But, he wasn’t done. He would go on to helm titles staring Batwoman, Supergirl and Wonder Woman as well as organizing DC and IDW Comics celebration of the LGBTQ community Love is Love created in answer to the horrific attack on the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

Manhunter

1 Like

Pride_Profile_The Ray

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: The Ray. The son of the Golden Age Ray, Raymond Terrill was literally kept in the dark to prevent his light-based powers from activating when he was too young to handle them. And, it is an impressive array of powers from light rays, hard light constructs, invisibility, light healing, and law breaking faster than light speed flight. Created by Jack Harris and Joe Quesada for The Ray #1 in 1992, the hero would appear as a member of the Justice League, Young Justice, the JSA, and naturally Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters. The Ray’s Justice League Rebirth issue highlights some of his struggles as a young gay man isolated from society.

The Ray has also appeared in the CW’s Arrowverse crossover “Crisis on Earth-X,” where he is married to an alternate earth version of Captain Cold, Len Snart. Russel Tovey reprises his role as The Ray in CW Seed’s animated show Freedom Fighters: The Ray which pits the gay superhero against Nazis.

The Ray (1994)

The Ray (2011)

The Ray Rebirth

Justice League of America

1 Like

When it comes to mixing Pride representation with a cracking good story, Gail Simone’s three volumes of Secret Six is tough to beat. Let’s give this writer some love for these characters.
Gail_Simone

2 Likes

Pride_Profile_Scandal Savage

:00_dc_pride: Pride Profile: Scandal Savage. Retractable claws, able to regrow organs, considers a sometimes dysfunctional team a family, of course we’re talking about Scandal Savage. A Gail Simone and Dale Eaglesham creation for 2005’s Villains United, Scandal is best known as a mercenary often at odds with her immortal father Vandal Savage. Scandal organizes the third iteration of the DC team the Secret Six in three highly entertaining comic series. Not completely villains, but certainly not heroes, the Secret Six are just trying to make a buck in the gray space between. Scandal displayed her skills as a ruthless strategist when she used her girlfriend, Knockout, to infiltrate the Secret Society of Supervillians.

Living dangerously finally caught up to Knockout, who was killed by an unknown assailant. After climbing into, and eventually out, of a bottle Scandal found love with Liana Kerzner, a Knockout look alike. Which could have been a problem when Knockout returned from the dead, if the women hadn’t decided that all three could be in love.

Villains United

Secret Six (2006)

Secret Six (2008)

Secret Six (2014)

1 Like

Pride_Profile_Catman

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Catman. Gail Simone just wouldn’t admit that Catman was a gimmick character that had no business in more serious modern comics. Created as a big game hunter and thief by Bill Finger and Jim Mooney for Detective Comics #311, Blake had been used and abused and left for dead over the decades. That is until Simone and Dale Eaglesham brought him back as a bad, buff, bisexual friend of big cats. Thomas Blake immediately jumped off the pages of Villians United as a new and exciting version of this once played out character. Catman would go on to become pillar of Gail Simone’s fantastic Secret Six series. In the course of his work with this team of mercenary misfits, Blake would come to fully inhabit the role of the anti-hero operating by his own moral code.

Villains United

Secret Six (2006)

Secret Six (2008)

Secret Six (2014)

1 Like

Pride_Profile_Jeanette

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Jeannette. Born into poor Hungarian nobility centuries ago, Jeannette was sent to live with a countess who was a serial killer, things actually go down from there. Eventually, this Gail Simone and Nicola Scott creation would become a banshee with superhuman strength, the ability to sense the presence of death, and a death wail. Introduced in Secret Six #3, Jeannette and Deadshot had a tumultuous affair that caused Simone to say “Jeannette was so busy doing Deadshot all the time, people forgot she’s bi!”

Secret Six (2008)

Secret Six (2014)

1 Like

Pride_Profile_Porcelain

:00_dc_pride: Pride Profile: Porcelain. So, what’s Gail Simone’s secret agenda? I’m pretty sure it’s telling awesome comic stories that depict a broad spectrum of humanity. She is sneaky that way. And, she did it again with Porcelain in Secret Six #1 (2015). Introduced looking feminine as Kani, Porcelain is trapped with Catman and the rest of a newly reconstituted Six at the beginning of the series. The same character dramatically changes their appearance to a more masculine look in issue #4 forcing ‘Kevin’ to reintroduce themselves. Porcelain explains to Catman “Look….Some days I feel like a girl…other days, not so much.” Porcelain has the ability to make things brittle, and takes advantage of it with a sledge hammer. This gener-fluid character has expressed attraction to both Catman and Jeannette.

porc

Secret Six (2014)

1 Like

Pride_Profile_Savant

:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Savant. This Gail Simone and Ed Benes creation debuted in Birds of Prey #56 as a one-time vigilante, turned to crime, turned back to vigilantism under Oracle’s direction. Genius, martial arts master, computer whiz with a facility for languages, Savant also has a chemical imbalance in his brain that effects how he processes information. That included the fact that his confident and bodyguard Creote was in love with him. Babs convinced Creote to tell Savant, and when he does they’re both surprised that Savant reciprocates. For more Savant, check out the upcoming The Suicide Squad movie.

Birds of Prey #56

1 Like

Pride_Profile_Neal Pozner
:00_dc_pride:Pride Profile: Neal Pozner. Comic fans are well aware of the names of artists and writers, but the other creative talents that build our favorite universes often go unrecognized. Pozner worked for DC Comics first as a design direct and later as a Group Editor, Creative Services. In the latter role, Neal hired such talents as Stuart Immonen, Travis Charest, Gene Ha, and Phil Jimenez who would later become his partner. Neal also wrote the 1985 Aquaman miniserties and designed the character’s famous blue camouflage costume. But, Pozner’s impact goes well beyond DC Comics. He designed the first gay-themed bus ads for New York City, posters for Lincoln Center, and incorporated DC Comics characters into a series of AIDS awareness ads. When Neal Pozner passed away from complications from AIDS in 1994, he left the world a better place than he found it.


Aquaman (1986)

1 Like

Pride_Profile_HIV:AIDS ads

:00_dc_pride: Pride Profile. DC Comics HIV/AIDS ads.

1 Like

Thank you for putting this together. Loved learning about the creators all in one place. I’m going to go back and watch some videos that you linked. :dc_history_club:

Absolutely in agreement with this. I understand the value and desire of researching the creator’s intentions and learning about their influences, life, and environment. Some of the things I like are 80-100+ years old, the times have changed and we shouldn’t take things out of historical context. That being said, everyone does have a different mindset and art strikes every person differently. If an artistic interpretation helps me better conceptualize my life in a meaningful way, it doesn’t bother me if that wasn’t the artist’s intention. I think the purpose of art and creation is to help us express or feel, and for enjoyment.

2 Likes

100% agree, like the “better conceptualize my life” that’s a very nice way of putting it.

As an artist, what better compliment than someone taking what you created and drawing from it for their life, whether that’s exactly what you meant or not.

2 Likes