ASK... THE QUESTION! Column Submission Thread

Thank you @HubCityQuestion That was very quick and thorough. I though Magnus became a metal man at one time, Was that Nth metal man? Also (if it’s not too much trouble) I know Tin made Nameless, was she made of tin or another metal?

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:clap:

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The JLD continued to function as the basement division of the Justice League up until the League proper’s destruction in Dark Crisis. Since vacating the Hall of Justice, the JLD has continued to operate as a team when the occasion calls for it – such as in last year’s Knight Terrors event through the Zatanna and Wonder Woman tie-ins, and as featured in Geoff Johns’ ongoing Justice Society of America.

I’m not Madame Xanadu, so I can’t speak to any of DC’s future plans. But for more recent JLD adventures, those are a couple places to cast your gaze.

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Hello @HubCityQuestion :0_the_question_jlu:,
It’s your friendly neighborhood Reaganfan78
Recently to now I’ve been replaying Batman Telltall season 2 Enemy within.

Amanda Waller in the game is a fun character to hate since she knows who Batman is.
In the comic, has Waller ever been to or spend time in Prison?

And is agent Avesta a real character in DC comic as well?

Thankyou so much for your time. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Okay, I appreciate the response. I haven’t really read the ongoing Justice Society of America, so I suppose that’s where I should go for my JLD fix. Here’s hoping there’s a JLD book sometime in the future.

:00_aquaman:

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Nope, Nth Metal Man was an original character from the Dark Multiverse. But your confusion is understandable, as Nth Metal Man quickly takes on the form and mannerisms of Doc Magnus.

However, you are correct that Doc Magnus took on a Metal Man form of his own in the 90s, which I missed in my first roundup. He went by “Veridium,” a fictional element I believe was originally used on Star Trek. I also missed Tungsten, his non-sentient personal aide in Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol.

In 1965’s Metal Men #13, we see that Nameless was not built from any specific element, but from Tin grafting a Responsometer onto a robot assembled from a Build-Your-Own-Robot kit he got from a hobby store.

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Thanks again @HubCityQuestion . You are always most helpful.

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Love that game! Typically, Amanda Waller has managed to avoid incarceration. She works for the government, and knows exactly how to avoid prison even when she operates on the other side of legality. But that doesn’t mean she’s been able to stay out entirely. Waller was briefly jailed during the original Suicide Squad run by Yale and Ostrander, before splintering off from the government and taking the Squad with her as a mercenary group. She was later imprisoned by President Luthor for acting against his authority during his tenure as president. Waller was eventually pardoned by Luthor’s successor.

Agent Avesta is an original character to the Batman Telltale series, and has never appeared in the comics.

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Awesome, thankyou so much. :smiley:

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All this talk about Justice League Dark, reminds me of a predecessor of theirs from the late 90s. A quartet of male mystics, nicknamed the Trenchcoat Brigade, had a 4 issue mini-series (if memory serves). Has that particular “non-team” ever assembled again? Thanks!

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They have not. The original Books of Magic story and the Trenchcoat Brigade mini which followed remain the only two occasions they have ever convened.

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Don’t forget about the other recent predecessor to the Justice League Dark: The Shadowpact from the early 2000s.
Notable members included:
Nightmaster
Nightshade
Detective Chimp
Blue Devil
Ragman
Enchantress
Zauriel

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Ohhh I’ve not forgotten them. Can’t say as much for DC though. :upside_down_face:

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An interesting theme of the 2018 Justice League Dark is that, according to James Tynion, he selected the membership to reflect each era of DC’s magic output. Wonder Woman represented the Golden Age, Zatanna the Silver Age, Swamp Thing the Bronze Age, Man-Bat the early Post-Crisis, and Detective Chimp the period between Infinite Crisis and The New 52, the Shadowpact era.

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And in the late 90s, we had the Sentinels of Magic in Day of Judgement

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An interesting bit of trivia (preceding my weekly posting over at Office Hours), involving Nightshade team affiliations prior to Shadowpact. In 1999-2000, Dick Giordano finally got the opportunity to bring his former Charlton characters together, at DC. At that time, Dick created the L.A.W. (Living Assault Weapons). A 6 isssue mini-series teaming these diverse heroes for the first time. Well, sort of.anyway. Several years earlier (1983) to be exact), ownership of the Charlton super-heroes was apparently in question. Or so Bill Black (creator/owner) of Americomics believed.

His (we try harder) little independent publishing company, out of Florida, printed several stories using those characters. Eventually, ownership was established by DC, and Black ceased use of said heroes. Although, altered variations of them, continued to live on in that other universe. But, during that disputed period, a team book was published. It ran for several issues and was titled " Sentinels of Justice." Several future members of L.A.W. made up an issue of Sentinels. Among them … was Nightshade.

Question, has the vastly underused Nightshade, ever met or appeared with Raven? Thank ya kindly. :slightly_smiling_face:

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Not really, apart from your typical “calling all cars” scenarios. Both are in Wonder Woman #175 when all of the world’s female heroes team up against Circe, and major events like Infinite Crisis and Convergence, but don’t have any meaningful interactions.

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I think I know the answer to this, but I just want to make sure. Is there any correlation between Liam James and Derek James?

Nope. Just two guys with the last name James.

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Awesome! Thanks HCQ!