ASK... THE QUESTION! Column Submission Thread

I’m not sure what “similar covers” you’re referring to, but I can tell you that the “Year Two” direction was a rather controversial one at the time, even behind the scenes. By some accounts, artists Alan Davis and Paul Neary were so put off by Batman’s use of guns in this story that they left the book after the first issue, to be replaced by then up-and-coming hotshot Todd McFarlane.

The story itself, as written by Mike Barr, is a little more reserved than “Batman uses guns now”. As it went, Batman was brandishing a firearm with one specific purpose: to kill the man who killed his own parents, Joe Chill. And he almost does it, too – only for the story’s main villain, the Reaper, to kill Joe Chill off before Batman gets the chance.

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This is sort of a follow up to a question i asked a little while ago. In the newest episode of Legends of Tomorrow Gary explains that when he shifts into a human he does so completely anatomically. Then he and Gideon have sex off camera.
I realize that is a different medium and continuity and may not be true to the question you’re researching for me but it may be the closest we can get to my question about what happens when shape shifters shift. Although i do seem to remember one issue of Wonder Woman where she was enslaved by a male warrior space race and it turned out that every hundred years they switch gender and enslave the opposite sex which infers a complete switch.

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All I can say to this is that there’s no blanket rule. Shapeshifting powers have myriad sources, and it’s unreasonable to assume it works the same way for all of them.

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Although an invention of the late 20th century, the internet didn’t really become the driving juggernaut it is today until the 21st. Making behind the scenes information much more available to the general public, with access to it. So, the editorial decisions being made at DC back in the 80s regarding Barr, Davis and Neary were unknown to me. But I do remember McFarlance’s rather flamboyant art style quite clearly. His work kinda stays with you.

And regarding another of those “similar covers” I mentioned, I was watching Batman: the Dark Knight Rises, again the other day. About half way through it hit me, why that story seemed so familiar to me. I’d seen it before, or at least a version of it, back in 1988. At the time, it was thought of as the darkest Batman story ever. And maybe it was. Batman: the Cult, was authored by Jim Starlin, art by Bernie Wrightson and edited by Denny O’Neil. Top talent, all!. And they proved it on this 4 issue mini-series. One cover of which, also sported another “Batman w/gun” image.

This is “old school” Batman, before the kevlar upgrades. So much of the DKR content, is present. Replacing Bane, is the “Deacon” Joseph Blackfire. A charismatic con-man, and leader of thousands of foolish followers. Instead of the broken back inflicted by Bane, the Deacon breaks Batman psychologically. Turning him into one of his brainwashed minions. So much so, that at the end of the story, we are still left wondering if Batman (seen dropping an Uzi) had used it, in his name.

Almost everything about DKR seems like a rewritten screenplay of the Cult. So much so, I’m surprised that Nolan didn’t acknowledge it as an inspiration for the film, in the credits. Many of you under 30s out there have probably never read it. If so, I highly recommend it. It’s a canon piece of Batman history that should not be forgotten.

Stay safe, be well.

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Ah yes, Batman does have a gun on one of those covers! I suppose it escaped me because I read The Cult in trade.

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Apparently, there’ve been more than a few Batman w/gun covers around, over the years. let me just list the ones I’ve found, and then I’ll wrap up this subject, at least as far as I’m concerned.To be specific, the covers only need to show Batman with gun in hand. Those where he is actually firing the weapon, are just a bonus. In no particular order, I’ll just group them by title.

Batman #30 Golden Age (shown handing a rifle to a soldier. A War Bond cover)
Batman #301 (standing over a dead body, gun in hand)
Batman LOTDK # 55 & 57 (stylized McMahon art, firing a machine pistol)
World’s Finest #164, 195 and 240 (shown holding gun on woman, w/rifle as Robin and Jimmy Olsen dig their own graves, and holding gun on Superman)
Batman #19 - vol 2, New 52 (a gatefold cover, Bruce Wayne w/gun in hand)
Detective #423,426 & 710 (firing a rifle, holding gun to head and holding a machine-gun pistol, respectively)

I was unfamiliar with some of these mentioned, and others I’d forgotten completely. I suspect there are others, still. As for the various stories in which “the Bat” is shown using firearms (for one reason or another), I’ll leave that subject for someone else to pursue. I know how you like to be through, maybe this’ll help in that area.

Stay safe, be well.

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Given the incredible complexity of trying to explain the shape shifting abilities of fictional characters, I think you did as well as anyone Q, with your answer to @a2.ton.51072. It reminded me of a similar query of mine on the differences between J’onn J’onzz, Reep Dangle and Gar Logan I put forth, awhile back. I realize now, in the name of chamelonic powers (for comic book characters), an absolute suspension of belief is required, for one’s own piece of mind. Your answer will suffice for me as well. So, thanks for that.

And if I may, a heart felt Thanksgiving wish to you and yours, Alex! As well as all the Mods and staff who keep and maintain this site, so many of us enjoy. I have to believe that most of us are in a better place now, then we were this time last year. A nice little thread on the subject by @Jurisdiction can be found elsewhere on site. Check it out. One last thing before I close.

Has everybody seen the Directv Stream commercial with Serena Williams & Wonder Woman? Or, as I’ve dubbed them, Wonderena! I’ve gotta say, Williams is “wonderful” in that outfit. Placing her in the mall scene from WW '84. And then exhibiting her pinpoint prowess with a racket! I can’t speak to the product she’s endorsing here, but visually, she’s killn’ it! And if nothing else, it reminds me to check out DC’s new Nubia and the Amazons mini-series. So, all in all, not a wasted effort. At least for me, at any rate.

Stay safe and be well everyone!

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Special Note from the Chameleon Boy Fan Club:

The name is Reep Daggle.

Thank You

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Has Chloe Sullivan appeared in any comics besides Smallville Season 11? I know she was created by the writers of Smallville, but I love her character and it would be cool to read some comics she’s in.

Also, what’s the first appearance of Pete Ross? I can’t find the answer anywhere!

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There was a brief attempt to integrate Chloe Sullivan into continuity shortly before The New 52 as a love interest for Jimmy Olsen, but she’s made no canonical non-Smallville appearances since then. You can find her in the Jimmy Olsen back-up feature to ACTION COMICS #893-896, and in 2011’s JIMMY OLSEN #1.

Pete Ross first appears in 1961’s SUPERBOY #86, “The Boy Who Betrayed Clark Kent!” by Robert Bernstein and George Papp. In the story, new transfer to Smallville Pete Ross takes special interest in Clark and Superboy, and Clark begins to worry that the new boy suspects them of being one and same – until it turns out Pete only wanted to cast Clark as Superboy in the school play.

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Thank you so much @HubCityQuestion

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My deepest apologies to the Fan Club and Mr. Daggle. A misstep on the keyboard can bring unintended consequences. :slightly_smiling_face:

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How many times before has Alfred been killed and, eventually, resurrected?

if this question sounds desperate, it’s bc it is :grimacing:

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I have answered this one before!

https://www.dcuniverseinfinite.com/news/ask-question-how-many-times-has-alfred-died/

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Thank you for the thorough answer! :grin:

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How does the Lazarus Pit work and what exactly does it do?

I’ve read some comics that the Lazarus Pit is used in, but it’s always used in different circumstances and has different effects on people.

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That’s about right, actually! There are very few hard and fast rules on Lazarus Pits, and they tend to be unique to location, the person using them, and continuity. The general consensus is that they’re pits which are specially treated with a chemical concoction designed by Ra’s al Ghul himself, at points where the mystical ley lines which cross through the Earth intersect. They are usually exhausted after use, and one must seek a new ley line intersection to concoct a pit thereafter. Their effectiveness depends on the extent of one’s injuries, and cause a surge of super strength and madness immediately upon revival – and with more subtle lingering effects on the psyche thereafter. Pits are best used on those near death. It can bring back those who have died, but the longer they’ve been dead and more severe damage there is to the body, the more dire the consequences. If a healthy person uses the Lazarus Pit, it kills them.

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oh ok! thanks @HubCityQuestion !!

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Very nice. Well done, sir. In answering @Jurisdiction, you also filled in a past observation/inquiry of mine, from last July. I was making a comment about Batman’s first encounter with Kobra. It happened in an abandoned hideaway of Ra’s al Ghul, in the Swiss Alps. It also contained a functioning Lazarus Pit. Kobra had "modified " this one for his own nefarious purposes. Batman manages to destroy the pit. But it appears to come, at great cost. @Jurisdiction was (I think), spot on in observing the Pit’s apparent “flexible” purposes. Always depending on the needs of a given writer. Nice of you to “provide cover” for their creative efforts. Nicely wrapped and presented to we, your most inquisitive admirers.

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Ofc Clark

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